Costs, savings and maintenance

Costs of installing a typical system range from £7,000 to £17,000. There are one off payments currently available from the government through the RHPP scheme to contribute towards your installation costs; £850 for air-source and £1250 for ground-source heat pumps.

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Costs & Maintenance

Over and above the one-off installation cost of £7,000 – £17,000, running costs will depend on a number of factors – including the size of your home and how well insulated it is. If you opt for an open-loop water-source system the maintenance cost is typically higher, although they tend to be more efficient.

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Heat pumps need electricity to run; to move the ground loop fluid through the ground loop. However, the heat energy that they take from ground, air, or water is more than the energy that they use.

Unlike gas or oil boilers, heat pumps deliver heat at lower temperatures over much longer periods. This means that during the winter they may need to be left on 24/7 to heat your home efficiently. Low Surface Temperature (LST) radiators are recommended and should never feel as hot to the touch as they would do when using a gas or oil boiler, but can be very efficient when working with a heat pump.

Savings

In the right home the savings can be considerable. The Energy Saving Trust estimates that when replacing an existing electric heating system in a 3 bed semi detached home you could save up to £610 per year, with homes using oil and solid fuel saving around £300. This is before any contribution from the Renewable Heat Incentive and RHPP.

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FAQs

Where should I put my heat pump unit?
Usual locations include your utility room, basement or even out in the garage.
Can a ground source heat pump be used with underfloor heating?
Underfloor heating is a great choice for use with a ground source heat pump, but large radiators or a mix of both can be used for distributing heat around your home. Heat pumps produce a lower temperature heat than conventional boilers, therefore they are far more effective if used with a larger surface heating distribution system such as underfloor heating or large radiators. A good rule of thumb is that if used with heat pumps, the radiators should be around 30% larger compared to the size of radiator that would be used with a conventional boiler.
Will a ground source heat pump be able to heat my home adequately in the winter?
As long as you have enough space in your garden for a system that meets your needs, and your choice of system is suited to your heating needs, a ground source heat pump should be able to heat your home comfortably in the winter. They are often used very effectively in far colder countries than Britain.
Can I heat a swimming pool using a ground source heat pump?
Yes, a system can be designed purely for your pool, be it indoor or outdoor, and if required it can form a heating and hot water system for the whole of your property.
Will a ground source heat pump save me money on my energy bills?
Yes, a well designed ground source heat pump system will save money and CO2 compared to other traditional heating systems, especially now that the government is in part funding new installations with the Renewable Heat Premium Payment grant. Exactly how much money you save depends on how well your system is designed and the efficiency of your old system. Find out how much you could save by completing our Energy Assessment.
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