The benefits of Wall & Loft Insulation

It is pretty much universally agreed that around a quarter of the heat in your home is lost through the roof and a further third is lost through the walls – maybe more! The more that this heat loss is reduced the easier – and cheaper – it will be to heat your home.

You can even get your walls and loft insulated FREE if you meet certain criteria.

Some of the main benefits for insulating your walls and loft are:

  • Optimal Temperature - Comfort is improved year-round as it will be easier to control the temperature of your home, both keeping it warm in winter and cool in summer
  • Reduces Energy Bills - by over 40% and it pays for itself in around two to four years, and keeps paying for itself year after year for over 40 years
  • Reduce Carbon Emissions – Saves non-renewable resources as less energy is need to heat your home, reducing greenhouse gas emissions
  • Reduced Condensation – When fitted well it will virtually eliminate condensation on walls and ceilings
  • Sound Proofing - Insulation materials are often very effective at sound proofing
  • Improve your Home Efficiency Rating - The EPC (Energy Performance Certificate) is used whenever a home is sold or rented to measure its energy performance - insulation will improve its rating

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Overall the savings for insulating your walls and loft could be £265 per year and 1.4 tonnes of carbon! This could be even more if you have solid walls.

Few investments are this good!

You can even get your loft and cavity wall insulation installed for free through the HHCRO scheme, part of the ECO, the grant scheme running alongside the Green Deal. The scheme is paid for by the energy companies. You can check whether you qualify for free insulation and apply through us by heading to our HHCRO Free Insulation page.

There are also grants available for solid wall insulation through another part of the ECO. It’s not yet clear how customers will be able to apply for this scheme. It’s likely we’ll know more in May 2013 – we’ll update this page when we do.

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FAQs

How is cavity wall insulation installed?
Small holes of about 20mm in diameter are drilled about 2 metres apart in the external brick wall where the horizontal and vertical mortar joints meet. Insulation is then blown along a flexible hose into the cavity through these holes.
If my house was built with a cavity, surely it's there for a reason?
The purpose of the cavity is to prevent rain that soaks into the outside brickwork from crossing to the inside wall. The cavity interrupts any water that soaks through the brickwork and drains it to the bottom of the wall where it drains to the outside. Injecting mineral wool insulation into the cavity still allows water to drain to the bottom of the wall, so the cavity still works as intended.
I'd like to make my period home more energy efficient, but will internal wall insulation ruin my original features, and will I lose floor area?
Internal wall insulation is a fantastic solution for period properties or listed buildings that would require planning permission for any changes made to the outside, or where the owner wants to maintain the authentic exterior appearance of the property. You don't need to worry about losing your original features or significant amounts of floor space, though. Modern internal wall insulation systems are extremely slim, yet ultra-efficient, and lead to minimal loss of usable floor area. Installing internal wall insulation does mean that fittings such as plug sockets and skirting boards need to be repositioned, so you'll need to make sure that any decorative features like cornicing or picture rails are carefully removed and refitted following the installation. Insulating the walls could reduce the annual carbon dioxide emissions associated with your home by around 2 tonnes and save £400 per year on your energy bills.
I live in a rented property, can I still get my walls and loft insulated?
Yes, people living in rented property can get their homes insulated, whether you fund it yourself, your landlord funds it or you get it funded through the Green Deal, but you must get the permission of the owner or landlord. There could also be a tax benefit to your landlord if he covers the cost - look at our LESA (Landlord’s Energy Saving Allowance) page to find out more detail.
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